Facultatea de Litere

UNIVERSITATEA DIN CRAIOVA

MASTER STUDIES: ENGLISH LANGUAGE. THEORETICAL AND APPLIED STUDIES

YEAR I
1. TEXTUAL TYPOLOGIES
2. METHODOLOGY OF RESEARCH
3. ELEMENTS OF APPLIED LINGUISTICS
4. LEXICOLOGY AND LEXICOGRAPHY
5. CONTRASTIVITY IN ESP
6. ELEMENTS OF BRITISH AND AMERICAN CULTURE
7. CORRECTIVE PHONETICS
8. EXPRESSION AND EXPRESSIVENESS IN ENGLISH AND ROMANIAN

YEAR II
1. PRINCIPLES OF TESTING AND EVALUATION
2. FUNCTIONAL STYLES OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE (part 1)
3. REFLECTIVE APPROACH AND CAPITALIZATION OF EXPERTISE
4. INTERCULTURAL COMPETENCE AND TRANSLATION
5. LANGUAGE LEVELS AND LINGUISTIC ACCOMODATION
6. FUNCTIONAL STYLES OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE (part 2)
7. ELEMENTS OF SOCIOLINGUISTICS
8. NEW APPROACHES IN PRAGMATICS
9. NEW CONCEPTUALIZATIONS IN SEMANTIC ANALYSIS

YEAR I

SUBJECT OF STUDY: TEXTUAL TYPOLOGIES
NUMBER OF CREDITS: 6
SEMESTER: 1
TYPE OF COURSE: workshop 2h/week
OBJECTIVES: to become aware of the diversity of text typology; approaches to translation of varied texts; special strategies of translation
CONTENT: Introduction; criteria, theories and linguistic schools; characteristics, examples and teaching strategies of dialogues, narratives, descriptions, informative, argumentative texts.
TEACHING LANGUAGE: English
EVALUATION: written examination
REFERENCES:
Adam, Jean Michel (2005), Les texts types et prototypes. Recit, description, argumentation, explication et dialogue, 2nd edition, coll. “Fac-Linguistique”, Armand Colin
Biber, D. (1988), Variation across Speech and Writing, Cambridge: CUP
Biber, D. (1989), A Typology of English Texts, Amsterdam: Mouton de Gruyer
Halliday, M.A.K. & Martin, J.R. (1993), Writing Science, Literary and Discursive Power, London: Falmer
Nakamura, J. (1986), “Classification of English Texts by Means of Hayashi’s Quantification Method Type III” in Journal of Cultural and Social Science, no.21: 71-86

SUBJECT OF STUDY: METHODOLOGY OF RESEARCH
NUMBER OF CREDITS: 8
SEMESTER: 1
TYPE OF COURSE: course 2h/week
workshop 2h/week
OBJECTIVES: to get the students familiar with the ethical aspects of research; research methods in linguistics and education sciences; quantitative and qualitative basics in research; writing a research paper.
CONTENT: the role of research in varied fields of activity and education; how to choose a research theme; steps of research; types of experiments; experimental means; validity and reliability; writing the conclusions and the final report; research and intellectual property
TEACHING LANGUAGE: English
EVALUATION: written examination
REFERENCES:
Bogdan, R.C. & Biklen, S.K. (1982), Qualitative Research for Education: An Introduction to Theory and Methods, Boston: Allyn & Bacon Inc.
Cohen, L. & Manion, L. (1994), Research Methods in Education, London: Routledge
Gilbert, N. (eds.) (1993), Researching Social Life, London: Sage
Parvu, I. (1998), Introducere in epistemiologie, Iasi: Editura Polirom
Silverman, D. (eds.) (1997), Qualitative Research. Theory, Method and Practice, London: Sage

SUBJECT OF STUDY: ELEMENTS OF APPLIED LINGUISTICS
NUMBER OF CREDITS: 8
SEMESTER: 1
TYPE OF COURSE: course 2h/week
workshop 2h/week
OBJECTIVES: to make the students aware of applied linguistics and of the strategies and methods of teaching English to non-native students; the functional aspects of English and develop linguistic competencies in English.
CONTENT: language acquisition; functional varieties of English; discourse analysis; ESP and Romanian learner sources of errors in English; using the database.
TEACHING LANGUAGE: English
EVALUATION: written examination
REFERENCES:
Avram, Larisa (2002), An Introduction to Language Acquisition from a Generative Perspective, Bucuresti: Editura Universitatii din Bucuresti
Davies, Alan (1999), Introduction to Applied Linguistics. From Practice to Theory, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press
McCarthy, M. (2001), Issues in Applied Linguistics, Cambridge, CUP
Mitchell, R. & Myles, F. (2006), Second Language Learning Theories, London: Arnold
Widdowson, H.G. (2003), Defining Issues in English Language Teaching, Oxford: OUP

SUBJECT OF STUDY: LEXICOLOGY AND LEXICOGRAPHY
NUMBER OF CREDITS: 8
SEMESTER: 2
TYPE OF COURSE: course 2h/week
workshop 2h/week
OBJECTIVES: to make the students aware of the types of dictionaries and their adequate use; the enrichment of the vocabulary; helping the students in making up new words by using the internal language means; language practice.
CONTENT: the place of lexicology and lexicography in language study; history and modern concepts; types of dictionaries in English and Romanian; internal means of word formation: major means (derivation, compounding, conversion) and minor means (clipping, back derivation, acronyms etc.); relations among words
TEACHING LANGUAGE: English
EVALUATION: written examination
REFERENCES:
Adam, Valerie (1973), An Introduction to Modern English Word Formation, London: CUP
Bauer, Laurie (1983), English Word Formation, Cambridge: CUP
Levitchi, Leon (1973), Lexicologia, Bucuresti: Editura Didactica si Pedagogica
Marchand, Hans (1969), The Categories and Types of Present-Day English Word Formation, Munich:
Stefanescu, Ioana (1986) Morfologia cuvintelor in engleza, Bucuresti, curs litografiat

SUBJECT OF STUDY: CONTRASTIVITY IN ESP
NUMBER OF CREDITS: 8
SEMESTER: 1
TYPE OF COURSE: course 2h/week
workshop 2h/week
OBJECTIVES: to make the students aware of the varieties of English in the UK and in the world; standard British English, standard American English, a new concept: standard international English; contrasting English and Romanian.
CONTENT: English and Englishes in the world; standard forms; national standards; comparing and contrasting – teaching-learning a language; contrastive approaches to English-Romanian phonetics, lexis and grammar; English idioms in Romanian;
TEACHING LANGUAGE: English
EVALUATION: written examination
REFERENCES:
Johnson-Laird, P.N. (1983), Mental Models, Cambridge: CUP
Dewey, J. (1993), How We Think, New York: D.C. Heath & Co
Leech, G. (1975), A Communicative Grammar of English, London: Longman
Lyons, J. (1995), Linguistics Semantics: An Introduction, Cambridge: CUP
Van Sterkenburg, P. (eds.) (2003), A Practical Guide to Lexicography, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Co.

SUBJECT OF STUDY: ELEMENTS OF BRITISH AND AMERICAN CULTURE
NUMBER OF CREDITS: 8
SEMESTER: 1
TYPE OF COURSE: course 2h/week
workshop 2h/week
OBJECTIVES: to familiarize the students with the basics of British and American culture and the use of cultural elements in teaching-learning English to Romanian natives; the use of modern approaches to teaching English literature; developmental stages of English: Old English, Middle English, Modern English.
CONTENT: the beginnings of English; the influence of Norman-French; Latin elements in English; old monuments on the territory of the UK; traditions, ceremonies, superstitions and religion; the British monarchy; the British Parliament as an institution of democracy; beginnings of education in the UK and the USA; the present state of education.
TEACHING LANGUAGE: English
EVALUATION: written examination
REFERENCES:
Green J.R., A Short History of the English People, London 1933
Trevelyan, G.M., A Shortened History of England, Penguin Books 1974
Wingfield – Stratford, E., The History of British Civilization, George Routledge, London 1930
Maurois, A. (1987), Istoria Angliei, Ed. Orizonturi, Bucureşti
Travelyan, G. M. (1977), History of England, Longman, London
Sanders, A., (1994), The Oxford History of English Literature, Clarendon Press, Oxford.

SUBJECT OF STUDY: CORRECTIVE PHONETICS
NUMBER OF CREDITS: 8
SEMESTER: 1
TYPE OF COURSE: course 2h/week
workshop 2h/week
OBJECTIVES: to make the students aware of the pronunciation differences between English and Romanian; characteristics of consonants and vowels in English; the phonetic transcription; SBE now.
CONTENT: anatomy and physiology of speech organs; sounds in English and Romanian; the phonetic alphabet; consonants; vowels; intonation in English; RP and variants; varieties of English; practice.
TEACHING LANGUAGE: English
EVALUATION: written examination
REFERENCES:
Bantas, A. (1993), English for Advanced Students, Iasi: Institutul European
Chitoran, D. (1973), English Phonetics and Phonology, Bucuresti: Editura Didactica si Pedagogica
Iarovici, E. (1999), Engleza Americana, Bucuresti: Teora
Jones, D (1972), Everyman’s English Pronuncing Dictionary, London: Aldine Press
*** (1996), Oxford Reference English Dictionary, Oxford: OUP

SUBJECT OF STUDY: EXPRESSION AND EXPRESSIVENESS IN ENGLISH AND ROMANIAN
NUMBER OF CREDITS: 6
SEMESTER: 2
TYPE OF COURSE: workshop 2h/week
OBJECTIVES: to make the students aware of the figures of speech in classical and neoclassical rhetoric; notions of metaphor and metonymy; practice
CONTENT: denotation and connotation; the style as expressive individualization of language; the evolution of the figures of speech; metaphor in cognitive linguistics; idiomatic constructions in English and Romanian. Metaphorical and metonymic conceptualisations in English and Romanian idioms.
TEACHING LANGUAGE: English
EVALUATION: written examination
REFERENCES:
Afana, Emilia (1988), Introducere în stilistică, Piteşti: Paralela 45
Gibbs, R. (1994), The Poetics of Mind. Figurative Thought, Language and Understanding, Cambridge: CUP
Lakoff, G (1993), “The Contemporary Theory of Metaphor” în Metaphor and Thought, Ortony Eds, Cambridge: CUP
Leech, G. (1990), Semantics. The Study of Meaning, London: Penguin Books
Kovescses, Z. & Szabo, P. (1996), “Idioms: A View from Cognitive Semantics” în Applied Linguistics, vol. XVII, p. 326-355

YEAR II

SUBJECT OF STUDY: PRINCIPLES OF TESTING AND EVALUATION
NUMBER OF CREDITS: 7
SEMESTER: 1
TYPE OF COURSE: course 2h/week
workshop 2h/week
OBJECTIVES: to familiarize the students with current theories and trends on human knowledge and thinking; critical and reflective approach to EFL; teaching English; what are tests for; test making – requirements and constraints; types of tests; evaluation and evaluation criteria
CONTENT: the concept of EFL and practical consequences in teaching a foreign language; the role of testing in the teaching process; test making and evaluation; what a successful test-maker should know; representation of results on graphs and statistical processing of data; practice.
TEACHING LANGUAGE: English
EVALUATION: written examination
REFERENCES:
Cohen, L. & Manion, L. (1994), Research Methods in Education, London: Routledge
Davies, A. (eds.) (1988), “Communicative Language Testing” in Hughes, A. (1988b), Testing English for University Study. ELT Documents 127, Oxford: Modern English Press
Hughes, A. (1988b), Testing English for University Study. ELT Documents 127, Oxford: Modern English Press
Hughes, A. & Porter, D. & Weir, D. (1988), Validating the ELTS Test; a critical review, Cambridge: The British Council and University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate
Silverman, D. (eds.) (1997), Qualitative Research. Theory, Method and Practice, London: Sage

SUBJECT OF STUDY: THE FUNCTIONAL STYLES OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
NUMBER OF CREDITS: 5
SEMESTER: 1
TYPE OF COURSE: workshop 2h/week
OBJECTIVES: to make the students familiar with the modern approaches to linguistics, to be able to select the issues of some major topics in linguistic stylistics, to provide practical guidance for text analysis; to develop the students’ awareness regarding the meaning of linguistic structures as they mark a variety of discourses and language usages in particular contexts and situations; to develop skills for the stylistic analysis of texts in terms of their lexis, grammar, textual cohesion and coherence, as well as rhetorical devices.
CONTENT: the functions of language; purposes of communication; attempts to categorise the functions of language; the micro and macro functions of language; the functions of language (referential, poetic, expressive etc.); classification and distinctive features of functional styles: fiction, journalism; scientific prose. Practice.
TEACHING LANGUAGE: English
EVALUATION: written examination
REFERENCES:
Halliday, M.A.K. (2004), An Introdction to Functional Linguitics, 2nd edition, London: Arnold
Hope, J & Wright, L. (1995), Stylistics: a practical coursebook, London:Routledge
Leech, G., Deuchar, M. & Hoogenraad, R. (2006), English Grammar for Today. A New Introduction, 2nd edition, London: Palgrave
Toolan, M. (1998), Language in Literature: An Introduction to Stylistics, London: Arnold
Widdowson, H.G. (1992), Practical Stylistics, Oxford: OUP

SUBJECT OF STUDY: REFLECTIVE APPROACH AND CAPITALIZATION OF EXPERTISE
NUMBER OF CREDITS: 5
SEMESTER: 1
TYPE OF COURSE: workshop 2h/week
OBJECTIVES: to offer the students a theoretical synthesis of reflective approach and capitalization of expertise regarding the teaching-learning process; to evaluate various practical solutions regarding language acquisition (first language acquisition and second language acquisition); to teach the students how to work out models and projects to be used in class; to observe the teaching-learning process.
CONTENT: strategies and directions in reflective approach; alternative paradigms; curriculum models; reflective approach; correlation of theory to practice; activities, strategies, projects used as new models; motivating strategies; planning of objectives, tasks; evaluation of results.
TEACHING LANGUAGE: English
EVALUATION: written examination
REFERENCES:
Avram, Larisa (2002), An Introduction to Language Acquisition from a Generative Perspective, Bucuresti: Editura Universitatii din Bucuresti
Hawkins, E. (1984), Awareness of Language, Cambridge: CUP
Littlewood, W (1984), Foreign Language Learning – language acquisition research and its implications for the classroom, Cambridge: CUP
Griffiths, M. (1998), Educational Research for Social Justice, Open University Press, pp. 38-39
Hart, S. (2000), Thinking through Teaching, A Framework for Enhancing Participation and Learning, London: David Fulton

SUBJECT OF STUDY: INTERCULTURAL COMPETENCE AND TRANSLATION
NUMBER OF CREDITS: 7
SEMESTER: 1
TYPE OF COURSE: course 2h/week
workshop 2h/week
COURSE OBJECTIVES: to make the students familiar with current aspects related to the complex formation of bi- or multi-lingual speakers; socio-cultural awareness and its impact on the linguistic performance.
COURSE CONTENT: mono- bi- and multilingual speakers; strategies of accommodation; linguistic and cultural identity; individual and collective identity; sociolinguistic variables in communication: power and distance; intercultural competence and methodological considerations; standard language; the cultural void and translations; fidelity and alterity in translation.
TEACHING LANGUAGE: English
EVALUATION: Written and oral examination
REFERENCES:
Cottom, D., (1998), Text and Culture. The Politics of Interpretation, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota
Grant, C.B (eds) (2003), Rethinking Communicative Interaction, Amsterdam: Benjamins
Hatim, B., Mason, I. (1997), The Translator as Communicator, London: Routledge
Tosi, A. (2003), Crossing Barriers and Bridging Cultures. The Challenges of Multilingual Translation for the European Union, Clevedon: Multilingual Matters Ltd.
Vilceanu, T. (2003), Translation. The Land of the Bilingual, Craiova: Editura Universitaria

SUBJECT OF STUDY: LANGUAGE LEVELS AND LINGUISTIC ACCOMODATION
NUMBER OF CREDITS: 6
SEMESTER: 2
TYPE OF COURSE: course 2h/week
OBJECTIVES: to develop students’ critical thinking; to know the main theories and currents that have marked the teaching-learning process; to understand mental and other processes that influence language learning; to understand one’s own status in the process of language learning.
CONTENT: the functions of the brain; mental processes; critical thinking; learning theories;
Methodology of language teaching before the century 20th; the century 20th; strategies and styles of learning; the principled eclecticism; intra-, inter-, multi-, and trans disciplinary connections.
LANGUAGE: English
EVALUATION: written examination
REFERENCES:
Cook, V. (1991), Second Language Learning and Language Teaching, London: Arnold
Cornilescu, A. (1995), Concepts of Modern Grammar, Bucharest: EUB
Richards, J.K & Rodgers, T.S. (1991), Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching, Cambridge: CUP
Widdowson, H.G. (1990), Aspects of Language Teaching, Oxford: OUP
Williams, M. & Burden, R.L. (1997), Psychology for Language Teachers, Cambridge: CUP

SUBJECT OF STUDY: THE FUNCTIONAL STYLES OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
NUMBER OF CREDITS: 6
SEMESTER: 2
TYPE OF COURSE: workshop 2h/week
OBJECTIVES: to make the students familiar with the modern approaches to linguistics, to be able to select the issues of some major topics in linguistic stylistics, to provide practical guidance for text analysis; to develop the students’ awareness regarding the meaning of linguistic structures as they mark a variety of discourses and language usages in particular contexts and situations; to develop skills for the stylistic analysis of texts in terms of their lexis, grammar, textual cohesion and coherence, as well as rhetorical devices.
CONTENT: the functions of language; purposes of communication; attempts to categorise the functions of language; the micro and macro functions of language; the functions of language (referential, poetic, expressive etc.); classification and distinctive features of functional styles: fiction, journalism; scientific prose. Practice.
TEACHING LANGUAGE: English
EVALUATION: written examination
REFERENCES:
Halliday, M.A.K. (2004), An Introduction to Functional Linguistics, 2nd edition, London: Arnold
Hope, J & Wright, L. (1995), Stylistics: a practical course-book, London: Routledge
Leech, G., Deuchar, M. & Hoogenraad, R. (2006), English Grammar for Today. A New Introduction, 2nd edition, London: Palgrave
Toolan, M. (1998), Language in Literature: An Introduction to Stylistics, London: Arnold
Widdowson, H.G. (1992), Practical Stylistics, Oxford: OUP

SUBJECT OF STUDY: BASIC ELEMENTS OF SOCIOLINGUISTICS
NUMBER OF CREDITS: 8
SEMESTER: 2
TYPE OF COURSE: course 2h/week
workshop 2h/week
OBJECTIVES: to identify and analyse sociolinguistic themes that show importance in language teaching-learning; to enable the students to compare and contrast linguistic and cultural characteristics of the various European linguistic communities.
CONTENT: LANGUAGE AS A MEANS OF SOCIAL INTERACTION; multilinguistic Europe; language and intercultural differences; dialects and standard language; linguistic community; communicative competence and communication rules; discourse analysis and models of communication; formal and functional paradigms; politeness; forms of address; political correctness and the tabu.
TEACHING LANGUAGE: English
EVALUATION: written examination
REFERENCES:
Baker, M. (1992), in Other Words, London: Routledge
Fasold, R. (1990), Sociolinguistics of Language, Oxford: Blackwell
Hughes, G. (1988), Words in a Time, Oxford: Blackwell
Levinson, S. (1983), Pragmatics, Cambridge: CUP
Palmer, G.B. (1996), Toward a Theory of Cultural Linguistics, Dallas: University of Texas Press

SUBJECT OF STUDY: NEW APPROACHES TO PRAGMATICS
NUMBER OF CREDITS: 8
SEMESTER: 2
TYPE OF COURSE: course 2h/week
workshop 2h/week
OBJECTIVES: to make the students aware of the field of pragmatics and its place in linguistics; to be able to analyse the effects of various components of the context on the production and reception of speech units in terms of grammatical structure and significance; models will be analysed on excerpts from original writings.
CONTENT: linguistic pragmatics – basic notions; the context; deixis, deictic elements of person, time, space, discourse; conversational implicature; Grice’s principles; discourse analysis; types of discourse and their characteristics; language and society – language in the educational system and varied social contexts; pragmatics and the didactics of foreign languages.
TEACHING LANGUAGE: English
EVALUATION: written examination
REFERENCES:
Cornilescu, A. & Chitoran, D. (1994), The Theory of Speech Acts, Iasi: Editura Polirom
Griffiths, P. (2006), An Introduction to English Semantics and Pragmatics, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press
Grundy, P. (1995), Doing Pragmatics, London: Arnold
Potter, C. (2005), Introduction to Pragmatics, New York: Umass Amherst
Searle, J.R. (1979), Expression and Meaning: Studies in the Theory of Speech Acts, Cambridge: CUP

SUBJECT OF STUDY: NEW CONCEPTUALIZATIONS IN SEMANTIC ANALYSIS
NUMBER OF CREDITS: 8
SEMESTER: 2
TYPE OF COURSE: course 2h/week
workshop 2h/week
OBJECTIVES: to initiate the students in cognitive semantics, its bases and George Lakoff’s contribution to the field; how semantics interrelates with language aspects, syntax in particular; concepts, classifications, the theory of prototypes.
CONTENT: basic principles in cognitive semantics; internal structure of categories; prototypes in semantic analysis; levels of classification; causality and prepositional use; prepositional polysemy; metaphor as a cognitive process; idioms; metonymy as a cognitive process, its functions; metaphor and metonymy.
TEACHING LANGUAGE: English
EVALUATION: written examination
REFERENCES:
Croft, W. & Cruse, D. (2004), Cognitive Linguistics, Cambridge: CUP
Finch, G. (2003), How to Study Linguistics. A Guide to Understanding Language, London: Palgrave
Kearns, K. (2000), Semantics, New York: Palgrave
Leech, G. (1990), Semantics. The Study of Meaning, London: Penguin Books
Lyons, J. (195), Linguistics Semantics. An Introduction, Cambridge: CUP

Decan,
Prof.univ.dr. Nicu PANEA


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